An Independent Website Considering the Future Royal Navy and Promoting Naval Affairs

 

  Astute
  Carrier Strike
   Future Carrier - CVF
   Pre-Downselect
   Pictures
   Design
   Deck Layout
   Propulsion
   CVF Statements
   JCA
   JCA Statements
   CVA-01
  MHPC
  F-35 Joint Strike Fighter
  Joint Combat Aircraft
  LPH(R)
  Lynx Wildcat
  MARS
  MARS (Fleet Tanker)
  MASC
  Merlin CSP
  Queen Elizabeth Class
  Successor Submarine
  Type 26 GCS
  Type 45
  Site Index
  Email the Editor

 


 

Future Aircraft Carrier (CVF) [2]

 

This page shows the evolution of the CVF concept pictorially.  It's interesting to compare the layout and ideas evident in the early artists impressions with the later.

A note regarding "Date": The date I give for a graphic generally relates to either when I received the graphic from the originator, or when I first saw it published.  Only if there is good evidence do I give a revised earlier date.  In some cases the date and source I give contradicts that in well known publications such as Combat Fleets - take your pick!

Due to space and bandwidth limitations, as this site has grown I have had to delete many of the larger pictures that were linked to the imaged displayed.  If you are really interested in seeing the larger image, please email me and I will do my best to send it you. 

 


1. Early Artists Impressions

(Below) Two 1999 artists impressions of the RN's proposed future aircraft carrier (CVF).  These both show examples designed to operate STOVL aircraft.  The lower picture includes a Boeing Joint Strike Fighter in the centre and its rival Lockheed Martin variant to the right. 

  

 

(Below) Another picture of a similar STOVL design published in 1999.  The relatively large island superstructure houses the four WR21 gas turbine prime movers.  This configuration allows an exceptionally large single hanger able to accommodate all of the standard (40 aircraft) airgroup.  It is sometimes claimed to be of a Thales design, but this seems to be very unlikely - probably it is a somewhat unfinished DERA graphic.

cvf9.jpg (32395 bytes)

 

(Below) Four indicative pictures generated for BAE Systems dating to 1999 of a possible STOVL CVF concept design.  The design (or at the least the graphics!) seems to have improved compared with the slightly earlier pictures from the DERA.

 

(Below) A flyer on its Future Aircraft Carrier proposal published by BAE Systems in 2000.

 

CVF video clip

(Above) A CVF in Action!  A very short video clip from BAE Systems of an early STOVL CVF design operating aircraft.  It's in the .WMV Windows Media format and thus requires a supporting add-in such as MS Windows Media Player.

 

 

(Below) An alternative possibility considered was for a large conventional CTOL carrier, this artists impression was published by the DPA in 1999 and is shown operating Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet aircraft. 

 

(Below) Two more views of DPA CTOL concepts dating to 1999.

cvf-ctol2.jpg (6229 bytes)

 

(Below) The third variant for CVF considered was for a STOBAR carrier.  This interesting 1998 artist's concept from Thomson-CSF (now Thales Naval Systems) shows a CVF operating navalised Eurofighter EF-2000 Typhoon's fitted with an arrestor hook. Notice the bow ski jump, but a conventional angled deck for aircraft to make an arrested landing.

rncarrier2.jpg (20062 bytes)

 

(Below)  This graphic issued by the DPA in 1999 shows yet another of its CVF concepts, this time STOBAR and also operating Eurofighter EF-2000 Sea Typhoon's.  Common "family"  features are apparent in all the DPA sponsored graphics, it's particularly obvious by comparing the islands. 

The STOBAR option was eliminated at the end of 2000. 

 


2.  Press Speculation....

cvfcomp.gif (11452 bytes)
(Above) A very rough comparison of CVF against other carriers dating back to early 1998.

 


(Above) The Sunday Times offered its opinion on CVF in March 1998.


3.  Unlikely CVF Designs....

(Above) An early concept design from the UK Defence Procurement Agency of a CVF configured to operate STOVL aircraft.  Sadly this interesting, if rather un-practical, design with a central island and two take-off runs converging in a single large bow ski-jump is unlikely to ever make the shipbuilders!


 


(Above) Another futuristic CVF design destined never to see the light of day -
the Stealth Trimaran Aircraft Carrier (STAC). 

 

cvf10.jpg (47290 bytes)

(Above) An unaffordable nuclear-powered CVF concept design, a hybrid combining CTOL features (catapults and arrestor gear) with a STOVL style bow ski-jump, helicopters and Hawkeye and JSF aircraft on deck. 


 

(Above) Finally, an impossible concept from the brush of some artist, a development of the Invincible class - still with a ski-jump and axial deck configuration (and no observable arrestor wires!) - supposedly operating navalised Eurofighter EF-2000 Sea Typhoon's fitted with an arrestor hook. 


 


4. Assessment Phase

At the end of 1999 the CVF project moved in to the Assessment Phase, with contracts awarded to consortia lead by British Aerospace (later BAE Systems) and Thomson-CSF (later Thales Naval).  At this point the design rapidly became more plausible.

4A. BAE Systems Designs  

(Below) This computer generated image was issued in 2000 and shows a concept design from the BAE Systems led team  for the RN's planned new aircraft carrier - CVF.   The ship is configured as a "conventional take-off and landing" CTOL carrier, on deck are CV variant JSF fighters (both the winning Lockheed Martin design, and a few of the losing Boeing design), E-2C Hawkeye AEW&C aircraft, and a Merlin HM.1 helicopter is overhead. 

 

 

 

(Below and left) These artist's impressions from BAE Systems of its STOVL configuration concept for CVF were released in early 2001.   The carrier is shown operating STOVL JSF fighter aircraft, again both the Lockheed Martin and Boeing JSF designs.   The ship is about 300m in length and 50,000 tonnes displacement  (presumably light, probably around 65,000 tonnes full load)  

 

(Below) Three images from BAE of its 2000 STOVL design.  Note the two Sea RAM ILMS mounts, the S1850M long range search radar on the foremast, and the "stealth" mainmast carrying the round Sampson multi-function radar.  The tops of the turbine exhausts can be just seen outboard of the Sampson mast, and the Aster VLS silo aft of the mast.

 

(Below) In May 2000 BAE Systems submitted an interesting proposal for a hybrid STOVL/CTOL CVF intended to operate up to 50 STOVL JSF fighters launched from its bow ski-jump, plus 4 conventional airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) aircraft such as the Northrop Grumman E-2C Hawkeye 2000, operated from an angled deck with a single catapult and arrestor gear.  The design would also enable cross-deck interoperability with conventional carrier-borne aircraft such as the US Navy's Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and France's Dassault Aviation Rafale M.  The figures provided by BAE give an impressive 310 meters (1,107ft)  length, 71 m (233ft) beam, and 53,000 tonnes [light?] displacement.  Although unsolicited and rejected at the time,  the idea was later to be remembered with interest. 

 

(Below) Three updated computer generated images of the BAE CTOL concept published in June 2001 which apparently incorporate several cost saving measures compared with the earlier design.  According to BAE the ship is around 300m long, has a beam of 72m across the angled deck, and a full load displacement of 58,000 tonnes.

Compared with the slightly older BAE STOVL design above, note the angled landing deck (strangely with no arrestor wires visible), two catapults, the smaller and more "stealthy" island with a separate "main mast" aft, the relocation of one of the aircraft lifts to a less convenient deck side position aft of the mast structure, and the more limited deck park area.  There are also some obvious cost saving measures probably caused by the cost of the catapults and presumed arrestor gear - the Sampson multi-function radar is replaced with a rotating long range antenna radar (S1850?) on the main mast, there's no Aster15 VLS missile silo, and Phalanx CIWS mounts are fitted instead of the more advanced Sea RAM ILMS.   Note the steam rising from the 92m long steam catapults.  It's uncertain how exhaust gases from the engines are vented as no funnels are obvious, it may be from waterline exhausts.  (Source: BAE Systems)

 
(Above) A computer-generated image from BAE Systems of the CVF showing the configuration
of the flight deck



(Above) A computer-generated image from BAE Systems showing the flight-deck crew in action

 

(Below) In May 2000 BAE Systems submitted an interesting proposal for a hybrid STOVL/CTOL CVF intended to operate up to 50 STOVL JSF fighters launched from its bow ski-jump, plus 4 conventional airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) aircraft such as the Northrop Grumman E-2C Hawkeye 2000, operated from an angled deck with a single catapult and arrestor gear.  The design would also enable cross-deck interoperability with conventional carrier-borne aircraft such as the US Navy's Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and France's Dassault Aviation Rafale M.  Figures released BAE gave an impressive 310 meters (1,017ft)  length, 71 m (233ft) beam, and 53,000 tonnes displacement.  Although unsolicited and quickly rejected by the MOD, the proposal nevertheless generated considerable interest and was to be later remembered. 

 

(Below) These artist's impressions from BAE Systems of its STOVL configuration concept for CVF were released in early 2001.   The carrier is shown operating STOVL JSF fighter aircraft, with both the Lockheed Martin and Boeing designs on deck.


(Above) A computer-generated image dating to early 2002 of the BAE STOVL CVF showing
 the flight-deck crew in action,  note the much modified superstructure with separate main mast.

 

(Below) The Future Carrier Team at BAE Systems asked GateWest New Media to design and produce a "Future Carrier" CD ROM for distribution at national events promoting their Future Carrier bid, inviting suppliers to register their interest.  These graphics show the BAE Systems CVF design in both CTOL and STOVL configurations dating to mid/late 2002.  Note the difference in flight deck, island and mast arrangements.

 

(Below) A computer graphic of the BAE Systems conventional take-off and landing (CTOL) Future Aircraft Carrier (CVF) concept published in September 2002.

(Below)  Two more artists impression of the near final BAE Systems CVF concept, published in October 2002.    Termed by the BAE SYSTEMS Future Carrier Team to be the Adaptable variant of the Future Aircraft Carrier, it is based on the previous BAE CTOL design but modified to  operate the Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).. The Adaptable carrier is optimised for a future conversion to Carrier Variant (CV) aircraft operations, thereby future-proofing the ships for next-generation aircraft or Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) operations.  The displacement is 55,000 tonnes light, 64,000 tonnes deep.

Note:
1. The advanced, low signature, bridge design, with a  distinctive "flying bridge" connecting the two main halves of the structure, with the third aircraft lift just visible underneath.
2. The three relatively small lifts, their size apparently being set by the dimensions of the F-35.
3. The bow skip jump but angled deck, complete with mirror landing aid.  There are no catapults or arrestor gear, although these could be fitted later.
4. The angle flight deck marked for rolling landings by heavily loaded  F-35's, this will  allow a higher "bring back" payload than Vertical Landings (VL).
5. The Sea RAM ILMS defence systems located on each quarter.
6. The stealthy hull shape with its highly flared sides.

Although BAE won the CVF prime contract on 30 January 2003, development of its design was ceased in favour of the superior design from Thales Naval.

 (Source: BAE Systems)

 

(Below) The following excellent set of pictures were used by Mediastation to promote their 3D visualisation and modelling solutions.  They show some interesting details of the late variant BAE CVF designs. (Click to enlarge the picture).

 

(Below) The following three pictures illustrate the hanger deck and flight deck layout of the final BAE Systems CTOL design of late 2002.  The hanger is accommodating 6 Merlin  helicopters, 16 F-35C fighters, and 4 Hawkeye E-2's, while 22 F-35C's and 1 Hawkeye E-2 are shown parked on the flight deck. (Click to enlarge the picture).

 


4B. Thales Naval Designs  

(Below) It's worth repeating this extraordinary 1998 artist's impression from Thomson-CSF (now Thales Naval Systems) of a STOBAR CVF operating navalised Eurofighter Typhoon's.  It would seem to be pure artistic speculation for PR purposes, painted after a short discussion with a reasonably knowledgeable authority.  It obviously has very little resemblance to the concepts that the Thales CVF Team came up with when work seriously began in November 1999.

rncarrier2.jpg (20062 bytes)

 

(Below) Graphics of the Thales Naval (formerly Thomson-CSF) CVF design that appeared in early 2002.  They show both the STOVL variant (foreground) and CTOL variant (background) CVF designs.  Despite the late date of publication, some characteristics indicate that these graphics may in fact proceed several issued later, and thus represent a very early Thales design concept (late 1999 or early 2000?).   Note:
1. The large crane forward of the bridge 
2. The Phalanx CIWS mounts on the small sponsons.
3. The Arabel radar, which may imply SAAM or PAAMS - although no Aster VLS silo is visible.  The changing radar configuration becomes a feature of the Thales designs!
4. The STOVL design has the same port side deck overhang as the CTOL design, allowing  aircraft parking both sides of the take-off runway.  This is a continuing feature of the Thales designs.
5. The "stealthy" shape of the large sponsons, which also provide a righting buoyancy when immersed during an extreme roll.

 

(Below) Another view of the same Thales STOVL design


 

(Below) An artists concept from Thales Naval of their CTOL CVF design dating to mid-2000.  Likely aircraft in the airgroup are all shown in the air:- Lockheed Martin JSF's, a Northrop Grumman E-2C Hawkeye's and a EH101 Merlin helicopter.  A Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet fighter is shown about to be launched from the bow catapult, and more are parked aft.  

 

(Below) A view of the Thales CTOL design issued in mid 2001.  The design seems very similar to that in picture above. This may not be an official graphic.

 

(Below) A graphic of the  Thales CTOL design - although first appearing in April 2002 it would again seem to be very similar to the mid-2000 design.

 

(Below) Three graphics published by Thales Naval in April 2002 of their  conventional take-off and landing CVF concept.  Length overall is about 290m, and displacement about 60,000 tonnes.  Note :

1. The highly unusual configuration of two separate small islands for masts, bridge and control towers, instead of the traditional single structure.   This provides a physical separation of key ship (forward island) and flying control (aft island) functions and reduces air turbulence over the flight deck.
2. One of the two big deck-edge aircraft lifts is clearly visible in the lowered position.
3. The Phalanx CIWS mounts.
4. The ARABEL target designation and tracking radar on the mast atop the aft island.  On French warship this is closely associated with the PAAMS and SAAM missile system  - although no Aster VLS silo is visible here/
5. The "stealthy" shape of the massive sponsons, which allow a large hanger space to be incorporated and also provide a righting buoyancy when immersed during an extreme roll.

(Source: Thales CVF Team)

 

(Below) Graphics of the Thales CVF CTOL and STOVL concepts issued in June 2002 - just before the MOD's JCA selection decision.  A Thales SMART-L early warning radar is atop the forward island while the massive mast on the aft island mounts a Thales APAR planar-array target designation and tracking radar instead of  the  previous ARABEL.

The strong similarity between the two designs is very obvious - the most visible  differentiators being the bow ski-jump and the deck markings!  Three arrestor wires and two catapults can be seen in the big version of the CTOL graphic.

The graphics seem to be very closely based on the models further below - perhaps a photo of the models scanned-in and touched up?  Or conversely the model may be based on this graphic.

 

(Below) Models of the Thales CTOL and STOVL CVF designs were on display at Farnborough in July 2002 and  Euronaval 2002 in October 2002.  The models are specifically dated "July 2002" and thus predate the UK MoD's September 2002 decision to opt for an adaptable STOVL configured carrier fitted for, but not with, catapults and arrestor gear.  

 

(Below) This  graphic of a strangely adrift (or more likely a hastily published incomplete version of the graphic shown next) evolved Thales CVF design was first published in October 2002. 

In accordance with MOD's September 2002 decision the graphic technically shows  a STOVL'ised version of the Thales CTOL design above, re-configured with a bow ski-jump and fitted "for but not with" catapults and arrestor gear.  The suitability of the Thales design for this approach is obvious.

Note:
1. The disappearance of all armament.
2. The curvature of the flight deck towards the bow, forming a ski-jump.  
3. The two launch positions amidships for F-35B fighters (one of which is flying overhead).
4. The extended centre-line take-off run for heavily loaded aircraft.
5. The two vertical landing pads for F-35B fighters - portside aft
6. The reduced size of the "radarmast" the aft island.  A Thales made 'Arabel' multifunction radar is still shown but this will probably be replaced by the BAES made 'Sampson' radar in the final design.
7 . The shape of the two big starboard-side deck-edge aircraft lifts, one of which is in the lowered position, appears to be revised compared with the lifts on early Thales concepts.

 

(Below) This graphic was widely used when the MOD's announcement regarding the CVF down-select was made in January 2003. Although BAE Systems was selected as the preferred Prime Contractor for the CVF programme, the CVF design would actually be based on that of the losing Thales Naval team, which was judged to be technically superior to that of BAE's in several key areas.  In accordance with MOD's September 2002 decision to select the STOVL variant of the F-35 fighter as the UK's Joint Combat Aircraft (JCA), the graphic shows a STOVL'ised version of the Thales CTOL design (see below for explanations), re-configured with a bow ski-jump and fitted "for but not with" catapults and arrestor gear.  

According to BAE Systems the Thales CVF design was a design concept that could only be used as a high level starting point for the final carrier design, the opinion of Thales Naval differed somewhat.  Many of the mission systems were to be quickly changed to those preferred by BAES.

Note:
1. The highly unusual configuration of two separate small islands, instead of the traditional single structure.  This provides a physical separation of key ship (forward island) and flying control (aft island) functions and, it's claimed, reduces air turbulence over the flight deck.
2.  The two large starboard-side deck-edge aircraft lifts, one of which is in the lowered position.  The shape is again unusual and differs from the lifts on earlier Thales concepts.
3. The lack of visible armament, although small sponsons where this could be fitted are clearly visible.  It seems likely that the final design will be fitted with CIWS/ILMS mounts such as Sea RAM, and possibly also have space and weight reserved for two 16-cell vertical launch silo's for Aster missiles.  The later could be controlled by an accompanying Type 45 destroyer.
4. Massive sponsons (not clearly shown here, see other graphics and the "superblock" diagram further down the page) under the flight deck overhangs allow a large hanger space to be incorporated, and also provide a righting buoyancy when immersed during an extreme roll, or in a  severe list caused by hull flooding.
5. The upward rake of the flight deck towards the bow, forming a ski-jump.  Although very aesthetic in appearance this wastes valuable deck park space on the starboard side and may be altered to a split configuration. 
6. The two side-by-side launch positions amidships for F-35B fighters (one of which is flying overhead).
7. The extended centre-line take-off run for heavily loaded aircraft.
8. The two vertical landing grids for F-35B fighters - portside aft.
9. A Thales manufactured APAR multifunction radar is shown atop the "radarmast" is on the aft island.
10. A Thales manufactured SMART-L search and  early warning radar is shown atop the forward island.

 

 
(Source: Thales CVF Team)

 

 (Below) This graphic first appeared in March 2003.   Note the mix of features taken from the STOVL and CTOL graphics (above) - which date to about six months earlier.

 

6. Future Carrier Alliance

(Below) These graphics were issued by the joint BAE/Thales "Future Carrier Alliance" (later increasingly referred to as the Aircraft Carrier Alliance)  in May 2003.  Note [as expected] radical changes to the radar fit compared with Thales' original proposals, a BAE Sampson multi-function and fire control radar is now atop the aft island while a Alenia Marconi Systems S1850 air search radar is atop the forward island, rather than the very similar Thales SMART-L from which it is derived.  The aft island has changed quite substantially in configuration, and a crane has appeared outboard of it for (among other things) the recovery of ditched aircraft and helicopters.  The unusual shape of the large lifts is very clear in these graphics.

Almost an excess of hard and soft kill defensive systems are now shown, including DS30B 30mm Oerlikon cannon, RAM PDMS and Phalanx CIWS, SIRIUS and Vampir infra-red alerting sensors, and Super Barricade decoy launchers.  These are probably are intended to be indicative of the options available rather than any firm selection.

The graphics shows the "Alpha" design iteration that bears only a general resemblance to the "Delta" design that became the baseline at the end of 2003.

.

 


(Source: Thales)
 

 

(Below) These graphics were issued by the joint BAE/Thales "Future Carrier Alliance" in May 2003.  Note [as expected] radical changes to the radar fit compared with Thales' original proposals, a BAE Sampson multi-function and fire control radar is now atop the aft island while a Alenia Marconi Systems S1850 air search radar is atop the forward island, rather than the very similar Thales SMART-L from which it is derived.  The aft island has changed quite substantially in configuration, and a crane has appeared outboard of it for (among other things) the recovery of ditched aircraft and helicopters.  The unusual shape of the large lifts is very clear in these graphics.

Almost an excess of hard and soft kill defensive systems are now shown, including DS30B 30mm Oerlikon cannon, RAM PDMS and Phalanx CIWS, SIRIUS and Vampir infra-red alerting sensors, and Super Barricade decoy launchers.  These are probably are intended to be indicative of the options available rather than any firm selection.

The graphics shows the "Alpha" design iteration that bears only a general resemblance to the "Delta" design that has been the baseline since the end of 2003.


 

(Below) This graphics of the "Alpha" CVF first appeared in September 2003, but it seems to belong to the same series as above. The unusual, although logical, layout of the aft (FLYCO) island is shown well.

Due to expected budget over-runs, by September 2003 the MOD had internally decided to change to a smaller and shorter variant of this design but an analysis of the risks subsequently led to a return to a large design, although with savings in areas such as sensors and armament.


(Source: Thales)
 

 


(Source: Thales UK)

(Above) This image was used to accompany the July 2004 Assessment Phase extension announcement.  It actually first appeared in May 2003 and is in the same series as above.

 

 

 
(Above) These graphics appeared in the July 2003 edition of the Japanese magazine
"Ships of the World", published in June 2002.  They are simpler than the graphics above, and may not be official images from Thales or the CVF Alliance.

 

(Below) This graphic of CVF first appeared in September 2003.  It seems to be of the same series as those above. The strange layout of the aft (FLYCO) island is shown clearly.

Due to budget over-runs, the MOD was at this time undertaking a detailed cost-benefit trade-off analysis and investigating a smaller and shorter variants of the design shown.


(Source: Thales)
 

(Below) I discovered this graphic of CVF in September 2005, but it's probably much earlier.  The islands and sensors don't match any other published images.

 


(Source: Beedall collection)

(Above) This Thales model of a STOVL CVF is dated September 2002 on a plaque.  It apparently (below) made its public debut at the 45th Paris Airshow (June 2003)


(Source: Thales)

 

(Below) Thales also displayed on its stand at the 45th Paris Airshow  a model of the CTOL carrier design based on CVF that it has proposed to France in order to meet its second aircraft carrier (PA.2) requirement.   Notice the Rafale fighters, Hawkeye AEW&C aircraft and NH90 helicopters on deck, and the different radars from the UK variant.  The lift arrangements and large size of the sponsons are clearly visible.


(Source: Air & Cosmos Magazine)

 


 

(Source: 7seas)

(Above) This small scale (perhaps 1:300) but still very interesting model of CVF was displayed on the Thales stand at Euronaval 2004 in October 2004.  Significant differences compared with the graphics released in the first half of 2003 indicate that it reflects a far more recent version of the design.  The most notable changes are the prominent raked funnels on each island, the apparently reduced electronics fit (although antennae will be hidden inside the new new stealth technology masts), the shortened hull length ahead and aft of the forward island, the reduced flightdeck width (and thus hull sponsons) aft, and the split bow ski-jump with deck parking to starboard.

 

 

(Above) These graphics of the "Delta" CVF were issued in October 2004, the first for 17 months.  Compared the earlier "Alpha design, hull length has been cut from the bow section and immediately aft of the forward island.

Major changes to the flight deck layout are obvious, as is the potential for fitting an angled landing lane in the future.  Note that the side-by-side JSF launch positions have been deleted, there is now just a single JBD alongside the aft "FLYCO"island.  The MT30 gas turbine alternators are mounted in the massive sponsons directly below each island. 

The aft island is greatly simplified and both islands incorporate obvious stealth or signature reduction features.  What appears to be an Alenia Marconi Systems S1850M long range radar is atop the forward island, but no Sampson multifunction radar is fitted. 

Self defence systems are relatively light, although a Vulcan Phalanx system and a DS-30B light cannon can be seen in small sponsons on the port and starboard forward quarters. 

 

(Above) This picture of the CVF CTOL (or CV) variant did not appear until early 2006, but is probably contemporary with the STOVL variant above - or maybe below.

Contingency plans exist to complete the second CVF in a CTOL configuration if the Americans cancel the STOVL F-35B variant. The first will still be completed in a STOVL configuration to operate the Harrier until it leaves service.  (Source: JSF Team)

 


 

(Above) These are two of several images that first publicly appeared in June 2005, I don't have a copy of the others.  There are no obvious great differences from earlier graphics, presumably indicating that the design has now matured and stabilised.  (Source: Thales UK)

 

 

(Above) A series of updated CVF graphics were published in December 2005 to support the announcements made that month.. (Source: MOD)

 

(Above) This graphic was also used by the MOD in December 2005.  Interestingly it shows a CTOL configured CVF.  It appears to be an update of a graphic first used in 2003. (Source: MOD)

 


(Above) This unofficial schematic of CVF a CTOL configuration appeared in early 2006. It contains significant errors. (Source: ?)

 

(Above) A model of the CVF displayed on the Thales stand at Euronaval 2006 in October and (below) the model in company with one CVF-FR nearest the camera.  (Source: Thales

 

 

 

 

(Above) Two more pictures of the CVF model at  Euronaval 2006 in October.  (Source: 7seas

 

 

(Above) This graphic was also used by the MOD in December 2005.  Interestingly it shows a CTOL configured CVF.  It appears to be an update of a graphic first used in 2003. (Source: MOD)

 

(Above) Profile of CVF Delta dating to 2006.  Stated (somewhat inaccurately) to be 280 metres long, 9 metres draft, air draft 47 metres, 9 decks. (Source: ACA)

 

There having been no new official images of CVF since 2005, this French image of their planned CVF variant (PA2) dating to March 2007 may hint at some of the changes made since then, most notably the finer bow advocated by France to help increase speed.  The flight deck is about 4 metres (13 feet) wider than planned for the UK variant.   (Source: DCNS via Mer et Marine)

 

Another picture of PA2, this one first released in June 2007. (Source: DCNS)

 

 

Screen shots from a video of CVF, probably dating to early 2006.  (Source: MOD)

 

The first new static graphics of CVF UK since 2005 were first published in August 2007.  The French influenced redesigned bow can be seen, some changes have also been made to the islands and the port side of the flight deck (presumably to improve standardisation with the French PA2).  The lower two shots show details not before seen.   (Source: MOD)

 

These pictures also began to trickle out between August 2007 and the end of the year.   (Source: MOD)

 

These graphics appeared at the end of 2007, note the significant revisions to the islands compared to the pictures above.   (Source: MOD)

 

 

 

 

 


7. Miscellaneous Illustrations

(Below) This illustration of a STOVL CVF is taken from the Sunday Times of 17 June 2001.  Although clearly derived from a BAE source the pennant number "45" is strangely displayed on the bow plating - the BAE pictures above show a more plausible "R09" on the side of the island. 

 

(Below) A rough schematic of the early BAE STOVL CVF design compared with an Invincible Class CVS.

 

(Below) This carrier comparison, offered by the Thales CVF Team in mid-2002, shows somewhat inaccurately the displacement of its proposed CVF design against other ships of the same type.
(Source: Thales CVF Team)

(Below) This graphic from 2004 shows the impressive size and displacement of the CVF aircraft carrier concept, even after downsizing, against the Invincible-class that it will replace, and the French Navy's Charles de Gaulle.


(Source: VT Group)

 

(Below) A schematic of a possible CVF like CTOL design, supplied courtesy of Justin Nixon.

 

(Below) This generic STOVL CVF design, presumably derived from the DERA and DPA concepts (top), was used in a series of complex simulations entitled "Project Vitesse"  during 1999.  The project created an environment using 3-dimensional geometric modelling with the capability to display concurrently, and/or in real time, the results of several simulation studies involving aircraft sortie rates. Simulations involved  flying the aircraft, the behaviour of the ship in various sea states, and human factors in preparing aircraft for flight.

The large island superstructure of the shown design can accommodate gas turbines for the ships propulsion, allowing for increased hangar space for aircraft.  A small island design with the engines buried in the hill, but requiring volumous uptakes/downtakes that impinged on the hanger space, was also simulated.

cvf-vitesse.jpg (47180 bytes)

 

(Below) A futuristic vision from A-V Projects (now defunct?) dating to 2002 of manned and unmanned variants of the RAF's Future Offensive Air System (FOAS) operating from an RN task group including a trimaran hulled CVF.

 

(Below) And another concept from A-V Projects, this time of its 'Avenger", VTOL capable, anti-ship UCAV.

 


Last revised: 3 October, 2004
 

Back to top